Joyce no longer risks being exposed to sexual violence

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March 8, 2016 | Posted in Humanitarian intervention, Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM), Kenya | By

To pour a glass of water is something that many of us take for granted, we just go to the tap and fill it up. For many girls and women in Kenya an everyday thing like having access to water can be associated with extreme danger. This used to be true for Joyce Kennedy, 19, from Kenya.

This is Joyce Kenedy, 19 years old, from Tharaka, Nithi County, Kenya. Ten years ago almost nothing could grew in this area, and people were completely dependent on the rainy season. Lack of rain resulted in crops destroyed which lead to famine. To fetch water for her family Joyce used to walk several kilometers every day, which often meant dangerous walks in the evenings where she risked being vulnerable to sexual violence.

– Often when I went to fetch water men shouted after me and called me names. It made me scared and I didn’t feel safe. Constantly being exposed to this was very stressful, says Joyce.

A few years ago IAS built a water irrigation system in Tharaka where water is taken from a nearby river and distributed to 130 local farmers so that they can grow vegetables and fruits. The purpose of this was so the farmers would become self-sufficient and not dependent on rainy seasons. For Joyce and her family, it  means that they receive water directly to their house from a water pipe.

– Now when we get water directly into the garden we are able to grow food to sell at the market. I also no longer need to be exposed to the risks that came with these walks, says Joyce.

IAS in Kenya

IAS has been working in Kenya since 1994 and currently has  five projects in the country. The focus is implementing education, water, hygiene and sanitation, peace-prevention measures and relief aid in different parts of the country. This project was funded by the Swedish Mission Council l, Erikshjälpen, Linas Matkasse and Mockfjärds Fönster.

Text and photo: Rebecka Woods

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IAS on ground in a fragile South Sudan

Beneficiaries after a post-harvest grain handling trainingPeople who´s been trained in post-harvest grain handling in Rolngap village in Aweil, Northern Bahr El Ghazal

October 7, 2015 | Posted in Civil Society Development (CSD), Countries, Humanitarian intervention, Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM), Quality, South Sudan, Thematic areas | By

October 7th, 2015

South Sudan

Since December 2013, the conflict in South Sudan has devastated the lives of millions of South Sudanese and displaced more than 2.2 million people. IAS is on ground in Northern Bahr el Ghazal implementing a large development project on Life changing food security, water and community development. So far 23 000 have been reached but the goal is to help 25 000 people.

Over 90% of the people in South Sudan are engulfed in extreme poverty and major humanitarian consequences are widespread ; high rates of death, disease, and injuries, severe food insecurity, disrupted livelihoods and a major malnutrition crisis.

Rural communities in Northern Bahr el Ghazal are particularly vulnerable when it comes to food and water insecurity. Here is IAS  helping people to grow food crops like sorghum, groundnuts and sesam.

-We want the communities to lead their own development process and therefore we train farmers on modern food production techniques.Farmers are trained on principles and practices in crop food production, post-harvest handling and storage of cereals and grain legumes, says Zaitun Ragota, Programme Manager IAS South Sudan.

-This training is very important because it equips the beneficiaries with knowledge that help in preventing or minimizing post-harvest crop losses, says Zaitun.

Improving hygiene and sanitation

Another component of the project is Water, Sanitaton and Hygiene (WASH) which includes new boreholes and construction of mini water yards. Each community who receives water are also educated in two levels of training. The first level is in hygiene and sanitation practices.

-Northern Bahr el Ghazal has a long history of communities practicing open defecation in respect to their cultural norms and beliefs. This results in bad sanitation and that diseases are spread. However, training in hygiene and sanitation has been very effective in changing the mindset of the communities, says Zaitun.

IAS  has so far drilled 11 new boreholes, rehabilitated 20 broken boreholes, constructed 3 new mini water yards and constructed latrines in three schools.

Promote girls education

The second level of training is on common cross cutting issues which includes gender, early marriages, child protection, HIV/AIDS and girls education.

-Through trainings on cross cutting issues IAS creates awareness on the dangers of early marriages and through girls activities we advocate for girls to remain in school. An important aspect of this is access to water. Girls are the prime water collectors for the families and often have to walk many hours every day to collect water which gives them no time to attend school. But by reducing the walking distance to the water points girls return to school and finish their education.

Women, men and children are all very positive and excited to IAS interventions, says Zaitun.

-All have been actively involved in the implementation of this project and share the feeling of owning it together.

Text: Rebecka Woods

Photo: Zaitun Rogota

 

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Now Uka Golicha in Ethiopia has access to clean water

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April 22, 2015 | Posted in Civil Society Development (CSD), Humanitarian intervention, Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM), Press release | By

April 22th, 2015, Ethiopia

When the new IAS well was drilled in Idiola, Ethiopia, the life of Uka Golicha was completely changed.

Access to clean water save lives, in many aspects. One of them is of course on a health-related level; clean water reduces the risk of having water-borne diseases, like diarrhea, typhoid fever and cholera.

In Oromia/Borena region of Ethiopia, 700 kilometres south of the capital Addis Ababa and on the Ethiopian/Kenyan border, clean, fresh drinking water was difficult, if not impossible, to find – until IAS team came to drill.

‐ People travelled an average of four hours round trip in order to obtain water – water that is still not suitable for drinking. The significance of the newly drilled well in my community is great and I ́m so thankful, says Uka.
In a country where the average citizen earns approximately 1,100 Birr a month (the equivalent of $60), towns in this region that rely heavily on agriculture for their daily sustenance are in even more of a desperate situation. It is not just the basic necessities that are lacking in this area, such as clean water, electricity, sanitation, and roads. The lack of water also means the loss of their livelihoods.
Recognizing this incredible need, IAS is embarking on a holistic approach to transform the Oromia/Borena region.

Job creation for the women of Idilola, as well as methods that would help farmers in the region improve crop yield, are a few of the ideas IAS is considering to engage Oromia/Borena in a manner that will go beyond providing the basics and will transform lives.

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IAS arrange IWRM seminar

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March 2, 2015 | Posted in Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM), Press release, Upcoming events | By

16-9ENGlargeSeminariumIWRMtisd3MarsOn Tuesday March 3rd 2015, IAS will arrange a seminar on:

Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) the practical way – using IWRM as tool for sustainable development

Agenda

– Unpacking IWRM
– IWRM in practice – some case studies from IAS experience
– Outlook – trends/opportunities/challenges
– Questions and answers

The seminar will be facilitated by Mr. Sahnon Abbass, IAS global IWRM Focal Point, and will be an excellent opportunity to, in an informal setting, engage in a dialogue around critical water related challenges facing our sector.

The seminar is only for invited guests.

Abstract/background to the seminar

This year marks our 25th year of existence as an organization. Today we have in-country registrations in 10 countries in the regions of SAHEL, East Africa and Horn of Africa. Water (and hygiene/sanitation) has been the backbone of our programming and will continue to be our main focus of engagement in the years ahead. Some reasons for this are: Water is a fundamental human right,; water is considered as one of the most pressing global needs; water is a continuous source of tension/conflict, but most importantly; water is one of the key drivers for sustained health and economic development. In order to continue to improve in this regard we took the strategic decision 7 years ago to adopt an Integrated Water Resources Management (IWRM) approach to water programming.

IWRM is usually considered as a higher level policy and longer term development approach. However, our aim is to make that approach attainable and practical. Our approach is therefore a field-based and project based way of dealing with IWRM. We use IWRM in both humanitarian and development programming and see it as a perfect fit for resilience and a way to bridge the gap between the two.

This week we are honoured to have Mr. Sahnon Abbass in Sweden. He has a strong background in geology, development studies, environmental planning and other water related fields and is serving as our global IWRM Focal Point. Based in Sudan he is now providing support to our various countries of operation on all IWRM related issues. He is currently finishing an updated version of our IWRM Manual and some of the findings will be presented in this seminar.

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