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April 18, 2017 | Posted in Humanitarian intervention, Somalia/Somaliland | By

REPORTER: Milward Mwamvani

“I had one hundred animals (sheep, goats and camels), but now I only have 20, and I do not know how long they will survive.” These were the words of Hawa Darmar in Tura Village, Garadag District of Sanaag Region, Somaliland.

The IAS Humanitarian Coordinator Milward Mwamvani was in the village for a fact-finding mission and monitoring of a drought-response intervention. After several meetings with stakeholders both in Nairobi and Hargeisa, this was an eye opener. For some time, IAS has been receiving updates on the drought situation in the areas where we have been actively engaging in various projects both in the past and presently.

The drought situation has become dire in the area, as reports also confirm the general situation in Somalia/Somaliland. The story of Hawa is just one of the many sad stories that are told in this area, and other areas affected by the drought. Hawa has been displaced by the drought as she tries to find means to survive the crisis.

Moursul Salaa Hamid is one of the people affected in Taygara village. Here is how our chat went on April 12, 2017:

Milwards Question: What is your livelihood here?

Moursal: I keep livestock.

Q: How many did you have?

Moursal: I had 690 animals (600 goats and sheep, and 90 camels)

Q: How many do you have now?

Moursal: I have 20 camels and 30 goats and sheep remaining

Q: How big is your family?

Moursal: There are eleven of us in my home.

Q: You have received 25kg of rice, 25kg wheat flour, 3 liters cooking oil and 10kg dates. How long do you think these will last?

Moursal: Maybe about 15 days.

Q: What will you do after that?

Moursal: We will wait for God to act.

This is a story that can be told by many. Talking to Huse Mire Ali, a Village Elder in Shiisha Village, he expressed that he has never seen anything like the present situation in his lifetime, with villagers suffering due to lack of food and water. He hoped that his people would get more help.

IAS seeks to continue responding in the Sanaag Region and other affected areas. A lot of money is needed to get enough food and water for the people and their animals to avert a worse disaster in the area. As water has been brought to the community in trucks, the signs are that the current water source is about to dry up. One of the drivers of the trucks explained that they were presently getting the water from a place about 120km away from this particular location. He also indicated that soon they may have to get the water as far as 170km. The rains are considered late already, and everyone is now panicking, not knowing what could happen beyond this… Will you partner with us and support us to respond to the crisis in Somalia/Somaliland?

/Milward Mwamvani photo and text, on location April 2017 (post created & updated 19 Apr – HB)

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