August 19, 2017 | Posted in Press release | By

One Million!

On this World Humanitarian Day we have a sad reflection as reports indicate that the number of
South Sudanese refugees arriving in Uganda has now hit (and probably passed) 1 million. This is the
sad reality of the situation that many around the world, including South Sudanese, have been forced
to be in. Frustrating as it may be in consideration that the South Sudan crisis is man-made, we are
reminded of the Humanitarian Principles to which we adhere, and continue to respond to the influx
of refugees into Uganda. IAS continues to join with other responders in this situation as we seek to
provide WASH services and join in the protection of Unaccompanied Minors finding themselves as
refugees with no one to call a guardian. We continue to hope and trust that the current trends in the
influx of refugees will change as the systems, including our own response capacity are stretched.
Nevertheless, we also continue to appreciate those that have joined IAS by providing financial
support in order for us to be able to respond to the situation on the ground within the existing
coordination mechanisms.

Gonya-Rose12yearsANDgrandmother15Aug2017The young girl is called Gonya Rose (12 years). She was in Primary 4. Her mother died before the war and the Father remained in Juba. They have no idea if he is alive or dead.

Above pictures: IAS is hosting SVT (Swedish Television) Johan Ripås to report to sweeds via TV-news; RAPPORT (24 Feb 2017, time 19:30) – and more at SVT. (Pictures: Julius Bitamazire)

IAS continues to respond to the prevailing humanitarian needs in South Sudan itself. Over the past
year we have continued to render our services to the communities affected by the current crisis. We
have also joined with others in condemning the targeting of humanitarian workers, not only in South
Sudan, but in all places where we continue to put our men and women in harm’s way in trying to
serve humanity.

We Need Rain!

Among IAS’ major areas of emergency response this year has been the Horn of Africa, with focused
active engagement in Somalia/Somaliland in response to the continued drought situation.
Responding to critical water and food shortages, we have seen some of the devastation among the
pastoral communities whose livestock have been destroyed by the drought as they not only lost
their economic sustainability capacity, but also have been rendered helpless by lack of food and
water. Hopes for rains coming at the times when they were expected have kept being shattered and
threatening the current situation to becoming worse. The recovery process itself even in the event
that the affected regions have received sufficient rains will take time. While recovery is of utmost
importance, it currently remains secondary as we strive to save lives in the now! We continue to
appreciate our donors in helping us respond in this difficult situation.

Lake Chad Region

The crisis in the Lake Chad region is estimated to be affecting around 17 million people in 4
countries. IAS has been responding to the crisis in Diffa, Niger for the last two years. Persistent
WASH gaps exist, and coupled with insecurity in parts of the Diffa region, teams have to be diligent
in planning humanitarian response. IAS is scaling up its response to the provision of potable water in
the region, and seeks to continue being relevant in addressing existing gaps.

Fit for Purpose

And so, with our teams serving in Chad, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Niger, Somalia/Somaliland, South
Sudan, Sudan, Tanzania, Uganda, and all the partners in countries where we are not physically
present, we remind ourselves that our desire each day is to remain Fit For Purpose as we continue to
serve humanity. With that determination we will continue to serve!

#NotATarget

 

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